AFRO-AMERICAN WOMAN FIGHTS WITH CHICAGO POLICE DURING ARREST

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BLOOD IN THE STREETS Coping With Menstruation While Homeless – by Jennifer Weiss-Wolf

Kindness Blog

Around the globe there is growing awareness of, and demand for solutions to, the financial and physical burdens of menstruation.

In developing countries the consequence of poor menstrual hygiene can be devastating, even deadly — linked to skyrocketing rates of reproductive infection and illness. An added dose of stigma and shame often keeps girls from attending school during their periods and otherwise living healthy lives.

Here in the United States, many low-income women and girls share a similar struggle — especially those who are experiencing homelessness. Inability to afford tampons or pads, or to access hygiene facilities, can severely compromise women’s health, productivity and dignity.

And no city knows the price and pain of homelessness quite like San Francisco, where a combination of rapid economic growth and sweeping gentrification has left a trail of collateral devastation.

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Standing out among the city’s array of essential service providers — emergency shelters, drop-in centers and meal programs — is the…

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Military History: Women Pilots who Flew During WW2 DENIED Rest at Arlington Cemetery

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Military History: Women Pilots who Flew During WW2 DENIED Rest at Arlington Cemetery

This is a damn outrage. Somebody needs to have their ass kicked for this and get it Corrected ASAP! -SF

These four female pilots leaving their ship at the four engine school at Lockbourne are members of a group of WASPS who have been trained to ferry the B-17 Flying Fortresses. (U.S. Air Force photo)

 

First Lt. Elaine Danforth Harmon, a Women’s Airforce Service Pilot, or WASP, was one of many women who served their country when it needed them the most. More than 70 years after Harmon flew military aircraft, her family wants to place her ashes at Arlington National Cemetery.

Harmon, a Congressional Gold Medal recipient, died in April 2015 at the age of 95. Her daughter, Terry Harmon, sought to fulfill her mother’s wish to be inurned at Arlington’s Columbarium. However, she received a call from the cemetery telling her that former WASPs were ineligible for inurnment, a fact she argues contradicts an earlier decision.

 “I said something must be wrong, but, at the time they offered me the option to appeal,” Harmon told War Is Boring in a phone interview. “I said I don’t think this needs to be appealed, I think there is something wrong here. They are eligible.”

The result is a new chapter in a long-running fight — wrapped inside a bureaucratic rigmarole — over resting privileges for America’s World War II-era women pilots.

The WASPs emerged during a period of rapid change and progress for the U.S. military. As the shadows of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan loomed, two female aviators, Nancy Harkness Love and Jacqueline Cochrane, proposed two separate plans to train female pilots in the event of American entry into the war.

In Europe, wartime necessities prompted Allied nations to enlist the service of female pilots. In Britain, Air Transport Auxiliary women ferried planes around the nation — with some American women joining the fray. Soviet women in 1942 became the first to fly combat missions.

Yet, back in the United States, Cochrane and Love struggled to get their programs off the ground, finally receiving permission to start recruiting in September 1942.

Read the Remainder at War is Boring

KZ Ravensbrück: Prügeln, quälen, mit dem Hund kuscheln

Brights - Die Natur des Zweifels

Außenansicht des ehemaligen Lagertors, heute Mahn- und Gedenkstätte Ravensbrück (2005). Bild: wikimedia.org/CC BY-SA 3.0

Ins Ravensbrücker Konzentrationslager sperrten die Nazis ausschließlich Frauen. Aufseherinnen quälten und ermordeten Gefangene wie die junge Jüdin Olga Benario. Als sie versuchte, einer Mitgefangenen zu helfen, wurde sie brutal bestraft.

Von Jasmin Lörchner|EINESTAGES/SpON

Im zwei mal zwei Meter großen Holzverschlag war es heiß, stickig und finster. Olga Benario kauerte auf einer Strohmatratze und bekam nichts außer einer Scheibe Brot und einem Becher Ersatzkaffee pro Tag. Musste sie auf die Toilette, tastete sie sich an der Wand entlang zu einem Eimer.

Olga konnte vor ihrer Zelle Dorothea Binz hören, die junge Aufseherin über den Strafblock und die Isolationszellen. Zum Dienst erschien sie stets mit perfekt geföhntem Blondhaar und akkurater Kleidung, begleitet von ihrem Hund. Mehr als ihn liebte Binz nur eines: prügeln und quälen. Die Gefangenen nannten sie “die schöne Bestie”.

Die Wege von Benario…

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